Library Science Fair

Saturday, February 8, 2020

9:30 am – 12 noon

Clermont County Fairgrounds

Multi-Purpose Building

1000 Locust Street

Owensville, Ohio 45160

Science Fair

Join us for our second annual Library Science Fair at the Clermont County Fairgrounds Multi-Purpose Building on Saturday, February 8, 2020 from 9:30 am – 12 noon. The public is welcome to visit and view the science projects on display. Participants in grades K-12 will present their projects to the public and judges. Winners will be announced and prizes awarded at the end of the event. Students intending to present science projects must register their projects by December 21, 2019 and set up their projects at the fairgrounds on Saturday, February 8, 2020 from 8:30-9:15 am.

Registration deadline: Saturday, December 21 by 5 pm

Informational Sessions

Event Description: Learn all about the Science Fair at one of our informational sessions! We’ll explore project ideas, research strategies, how to collect and analyze your data, and how to make your project into a polished presentation, including a Science Fair board. If you already have a project in mind, please bring your ideas, in as much detail as you are able to give, and get your project approved right away! But don’t worry if you’re just getting started; the library is here to help you along the way. If you are unable to make any of these sessions, ask a staff member for informational brochures, or below for more information and resources.

Work Sessions

Event Description: For students who have registered a Science Fair project with Clermont County Public Library, join us for a work session at which you can ask questions, work with your data, and put your information onto a board. If you plan to work on your Science Fair board, please bring your own; the library will provide paper, glue, and other supplies.

Information brochures

Resources

Library Databases

Explora: Supports both student research and classroom instruction with rich, reliable content.

Kids Infobits : A great resource for young children that includes books, pictures, magazines, and news articles; provides images alongside text for ease of searching.

Science in Context: Provides contextual information on hundreds of today’s most significant science topics.

Science Reference Center: Topics covered include biology, chemistry, earth science, environmental science, science as inquiry and more

World Book Online Reference Center: Online version of the World Book Encyclopedia.

Books

Championship Science Fair Projects : 100 Sure-to-Win Experiments by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

Quick-but-Great Science Fair Projects by Shar Levine

Sure-to-Win Science Fair Projects by Joe Rhatigan

Blue Ribbon Science Projects by Glen Vecchione

And many more at your local library!

Web Resources

 www.sciencebuddies.org

www.sciencefaircentral.com

https://www.education.com/science-fair/

https://learning-center.homesciencetools.com/science-projects/

FAQ – Complete rules

General Rules

Please review all of the general Science Fair Rules.

  1. Think safety first before you start.
  2. Never eat or drink during an experiment, and keep your work area clean.
  3. Wear protective glasses when doing any experiment that could lead to eye injury.
  4. Do not touch, taste, or inhale chemicals or chemical solutions.
  5. Respect all life forms. Participants using human subjects or other living organisms will have additional ISEF (International Science and Engineering Fair) requirements and paperwork.
  6. All experiments should be supervised by an adult.
  7. Always wash your hands after doing the experiment, especially if you have been handling chemicals.
  8. Dispose of waste properly.
  9. Any project that breaks library policy and/or local, state, or federal laws is NOT permitted.
  10. Use safety on the internet!  Be sure to let adults know which websites you are visiting or have them help you with your research.
  11. If there are dangerous aspects of your experiment, like using a sharp tool or the stove, please have an adult help you.

Age Categories

Participants in the 2020 Library Science Fair will compete in the following age categories:

  • Grades Kindergarten-4
  • Grades 5-8
  • Grades 9-12

Students in grades Kindergarten to Four have the following project options:

  • Model – Create a model of a scientific area (e.g., solar system, human eye, etc.).
  • Demonstration – Explain how something works or why something happens the way it does.
  • Scientific Experiment – Answer a question or solve a problem. This type of project must follow the scientific method.
  • Research Project – An endeavor to answer a scientific question using research instead of a hands-on experiment. A research project should still follow the scientific method with the exception of the experiment, instead using multiple sources (books, databases, journal articles, etc.)  to research the answer to the question.  The student would then compile the research, analyze it, and draw a conclusion based on data collected from the research.

Students in grades 5-12 have the following project options:

  • Scientific Experiment – Answer a question or solve a problem. This type of project must follow the scientific method.
  • Engineering Design – Design a solution to a problem and test the outcomes.
  • Research Project – An endeavor to answer a scientific question using research instead of a hands-on experiment. A research project should still follow the scientific method with the exception of the experiment, instead using multiple sources (books, databases, journal articles, etc.)  to research the answer to the question.  The student would then compile the research, analyze it, and draw a conclusion based on data collected from the research.

Participants in grades 5-12 may be eligible to move on to the District Science Fair.

Group Projects

Students may work jointly on a project at a maximum of two students per project. Each student must submit a separate registration form through the Library Science Fair web page. In the event that a group project is awarded a prize, each student involved in the project will receive a prize of equal value.

Projects Involving Electricity

Students may use a source of electricity when conducting their projects, but if the student(s) would like to display these components during the Science Fair event, the components must be battery-powered and participants must provide their own batteries. Participants are not required to bring these components to the event; they may include photos on their presentation board instead.

Research Projects

Research projects (see the definition above) are allowed at all age levels. When considering projects for prizes, those that follow the scientific method (or models and demonstrations in the Kindergarten-Grade 4 category) will be considered first for prizes, ahead of research projects in the same category.

Projects Involving Animal and/or Human Subjects

Only projects in the Grades 5-8 and Grades 9-12 categories are permitted to use human or animal subjects. All participants in these age categories must complete the ISEF forms, which include human and animal subject consent forms, even if the project does not involve such subjects. The Science Fair Committee will share the required forms with participants once the project proposals have been approved.

ISEF Rules and Form

The following rules and form may be applicable to certain projects. The Library Science Fair Committee will contact you in the event that these apply to your project. All participants must agree to adhere to the rules and be willing to fill out the forms if necessary.
https://student.societyforscience.org/isef-forms

ISEF Form 1A [https://sspcdn.blob.core.windows.net/files/Documents/SEP/ISEF/2020/Forms/1A…]

Participants in grades 5-12 must complete this form and return it to any Clermont County library branch (please tell a staff member that it is for the Science Fair) or email the completed form to cfrank@clermontlibrary.org.

 

Qualifying for prizes

The following prizes will be awarded:

  • Grades Kindergarten-4
    • First Prize
      • Must receive a superior rating from the judges
    • Second Prize
      • Must receive a superior or excellent rating from the judges
    • Third Prize
      • Must receive a superior or excellent rating from the judges
  • Grades 5-8
    • First Prize
      • Must receive a superior rating from the judges
    • Second Prize
      • Must receive a superior or excellent rating from the judges
    • Third Prize
      • Must receive a superior or excellent rating from the judges
  • Grades 9-12
    • First Prize
      • Must receive a superior rating from the judges
    • Second Prize
      • Must receive a superior or excellent rating from the judges
    • Third Prize
      • Must receive a superior or excellent rating from the judges

Research projects are allowed in all grade categories. When considering projects for prizes, those that follow the scientific method (or models and demonstrations in the Kindergarten-Grade 4 category, and the engineering design method in the Grades 5-8 or 9-12 categories) will be considered first for prizes, ahead of research projects in the same category.

An abstract, a research plan, and a research report are required for all projects in Grades 5-8 and Grades 9-12.

In the event that a group project is awarded a prize, each student involved in the project will receive a prize of equal value.

Which citation format should be used for my research?

We suggest but do not require that you use APA (American Psychological Association) format.

District Science Fair

Participants who receive a superior rating from the judges will be eligible to move on to the District Science Fair. The Science Fair committee will decide which projects to submit to the District Science Fair.

District Science Fair participants must be from Clermont, Butler, Warren, Hamilton, or Preble counties.

Participants using human subjects or other living organisms will have additional requirements and paperwork that will have to be completed in order to qualify for the District Science Fair. The Science Fair Committee will communicate these requirements to the participants in the event that such a project is submitted to the District Science Fair.

The ISEF (International Science and Engineering Fair) guidelines for 2019-2020 includes the following statement, to which all participants should adhere:

Ethics Statement

Student researchers, as well as adults who have a role in their projects, are expected to maintain the highest ethical standards. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Integrity. Honesty, objectivity, and avoidance of conflicts of interest are expected during every phase of the research. The project should reflect independent research done by the student(s), and represent only one year’s work.
  • Legality. Compliance with all federal, country, state and local laws is essential. All projects must be approved by a Scientific Review Committee (SRC), and when necessary must also be approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB), Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), and/or Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC).
  • Respect for Confidentiality and Intellectual Property. Confidential communications, as well as patents, copyrights, and other forms of intellectual property must be honored. Unpublished data, methods, or results may not be used withoutpermission, and credit must be given to all contributions to research.
  • Stewardship of the Environment. It is the responsibility of the researcher(s) and the adults involved to protect the environment and its organisms from harm. All projects involve some amount of risk. Everyone is expected to recognize the hazards, assess the risks, minimize them, and prepare for emergencies.
  • Animal Care. Proper care and respect must be given to vertebrate animals. The guiding principles for the use of animals in research includes the following “Four R’s”: Replace, Reduce, Refine, Respect.
  • Human Participant Protection. The highest priority is the health and well-being of the student researcher(s) and human participants.
  • Potentially Hazardous Biological Agents (PHBAs). It is the responsibility of the student and adults involved in the project to conduct and document a risk assessment, and to safely handle and dispose of organisms and materials.

Scientific fraud and misconduct are not condoned at any level of research or competition. This includes plagiarism, forgery, use or presentation of other researcher’s work as one’s own and fabrication of data.

Fraudulent projects will fail to qualify for competition in affiliated fairs and ISEF. Society for Science and the Public reserves the right to revoke recognition of a project subsequently found to have been fraudulent.”

International Rules: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs 2019–2020, https://sspcdn.blob.core.windows.net/files/Documents/SEP/ISEF/2020/Rules/Bo… Pages 4-5

More information about the District Science Fair can be found on the following website: https://cech.uc.edu/sciencefair/students.html